Tomorrow’s Tomatoes Look to the Past


The WFU News Service recently published an article featuring the work of Dr. Gloria Muday and Beckman Award winner Kathleen DiNapoli.  This article sheds light on their research into the genetics and physiology of heirloom tomatoes to locate ancestral genes that offer growth advantages.

Pull quote:

“The world population continues to grow despite our finite sources of agricultural land and compounding this, global climate change is limiting the amount of land that is suitable for plant growth. If we are able to understand how these genes from ancestral tomatoes function on a molecular level, we may be able to breed plants that would grow more successfully in different climates.” 

Kathleen DiNapoli

Please visit the WFU News Service to read the full-text article:

http://news.wfu.edu/2014/06/18/tomorrows-tomatoes-look-to-the-past/

Kathleen DiNapoli (left) and Dr. Gloria Muday in the Biology greenhouse showing their heirloom specimens

Kathleen DiNapoli (left) and Dr. Gloria Muday in the Biology greenhouse showing their heirloom specimens